Top 7 Deadly Sins of Conversations Posturing. This means appearing to be something you are not. Don’t pretend to know things you don’t know or be things you can’t be. Instead, BE GENUINE. Pride. Pride screams "I know everything and you know nothing." Pride tells others you don’t need to listen to them. You dismiss their ideas or involvement. Don’t focus on your being better than others. Instead, BE INTERESTED. Magic mirror. This is the approach of trying to be the center of every conversation. You always need to have the last word. You are your own favorite topic. Don’t try so hard to get people to pay attention to you. Instead, FOCUS ON OTHERS. Blame game. This is the game of passing blame quickly to someone else in the hopes it will stick. You are so concerned about not
NFL jerseys china being at fault you don’t worry at all about finding a solution. Don’t be so worried about blaming others. Instead, WORK ON A SOLUTION. Withdrawal. This is like the kid who gets mad when his friends won’t do what he wants so he takes his marbles and goes home. Your response when others don’t do what you want is "I’m outta here!" Don’t lose opportunities by withdrawing. Instead, BE WILLING TO LET SOMEONE ELSE DECIDE. Accidental tourist. This is the person who stumbles into conversations without any thought or intention and just lets whatever happens happen. It’s the "whatever" approach, where you shun responsibility. Don’t abdicate your role in the success of a conversation. Instead, TAKE RESPONSIBILITY. Deaf ears. You don’t need to say the words to deliver the message "I’m not listening." Listening is the way to learn more. Don’t fall in the habit of planning your response while others are speaking. Instead, TRY TO UNDERSTAND OTHERS.

the past and I really wasn’t up for another one," Wallace said. Civil Service." In about 70 percent of senior executive departures, the survey showed, the agency makes no attempt to encourage the officials to stay. Wallace said he was part of that majority. "They knew I was going to leave and they would have wanted me to stay, but they didn’t give me any incentive to stay by giving me a retention bonus," he said. John Palguta is vice president for policy at the Partnership for Public Service, which encourages careers in government. In well run agencies, he said, top officials keep up steady communication with their valued executives. "In organizations where there’s good communication, part of that communication is focused on where things are not going well and trying to do something about it," he said. The survey was based on exit surveys of 211 executives who were leaving their agencies between April 2013 and July 2014. It showed that about half of the executives planned to
MLB jerseys work

Articles Connexes:

Articles Connexes:

« »